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Creative Links

A flood of (bad) advertising is coming for your Snapchat—and that might be ok




Now, the floodgates are opening. It’s a blessing for advertisers, but it could be a curse for users—and Snapchat.

Cue a flood of ads that maybe don’t look that impressive, a may not even have been designed for Snap.
But Snap’s move was inevitable. We’ve seen it before on all the older online platforms: Google, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Instagram opened up its floodgates in August 2015, and yeah, not every Instagram ad is great.

"There will always be good eggs and bad, but hopefully Snap really leans into user feedback to keep the creative threshold high," said Mike Metzler, creative strategist at Delmondo, a creative studio and technology company that provides Snapchat analytics.

Snap is still keeping some control of the process. No ad goes live without Snapchat’s review (for now), but advertisers now have much more freedom to get weird.
"Advertisers want to be able to test before making big commitments on spend. So I think this will bring in a lot of new advertisers," Metzler continued.

Those new advertisers will be crucial to Snap’s future.
Unlike Instagram and other social apps, there’s a strange thing about Snapchat: low-quality ads may work in its favor. Laughable content may be exactly what makes a good ad because Snapchat itself is a platform for sharing fun and authentic photos and videos.


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Standards body unveils plan to crack down on sexist advertisements




The project, which the watchdog considers the most comprehensive review of gender stereotyping anywhere in the world, follows a major crackdown on “airbrushing.” It has also banned ads featuring “unhealthily thin” models.
Its proposals will also clarify the existing code relating to ads that objectify or inappropriately sexualise women and girls.

“Our review shows that specific forms of gender stereotypes in ads can contribute to harm for adults and children,” said Ella Smillie, lead author of the report.
“Such portrayal scan limit how people see themselves, how others see them, and limit the life decisions they take. Tougher standards in the areas we’ve identified will address harms and ensure that modern society is better represented.”

The ASA said it was not looking at implementing a blanket ban – it will still be acceptable for ads to feature a woman doing cleaning or a man doing DIY tasks – but there are versions of this type of commercial that will now come under scrutiny.

The ASA’s report will now be handed to the Committee of Advertising Practice, which sets the UK ad code across all forms of media to develop new standards to be turned into rules and enforced by the ad watchdog.


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Research as Art




Researchers are creative by nature – and at Swansea University we wanted to give them the opportunity to communicate their work in a different way, as art. Our annual Research as Art competition gives researchers a platform to explore their creativity and convey the emotion and humanity in their research.

The striking images entered into the competition are the hook to draw the audience in, but the text is the researcher’s opportunity to engage with people. The most compelling submissions aren’t just an image that was lying on a lab hard drive for years, or a beautiful false-coloured electron microscopy image by which colour is added to an image so that researchers can see the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. They are the submissions that describe the years of failure in the laboratory, the inspiration, and the way researchers question themselves daily.

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The photography market isn’t just about names




The most expensive photograph ever sold was not by a photographer, nor was the photograph taken by the artist. “The New Jeff Koons (1980)” is a primary-school photograph of the artist sitting with a box of crayons, mounted as a black-and-white, 40-x-30-inch (102-x-76cm) transparency on a lightbox and sold in 2013 for $9.4m. This is atypical for photography, where prices are lower and volumes are higher than in other contemporary art. The average photograph sells for $10,000 at auction, against $60,000 for a painting.

“The New Jeff Koons” is a unique work. Most fine-art photographs, though, are printed in signed limited editions, normally of between eight and 15 photos. For works made from negatives, the photographers or their estates keep tight control to ensure that no new prints can be made, which would amount to defrauding the original buyers. As the edition begins to sell out, prices rise. With limited-edition prints from digital photography, photographers usually promise to destroy the files. Some collectors will not touch digital, but others are perfectly happy to collect it, and prices are not generally lower than recent work produced on film.

Gallerists at Photo London were keen to tell the stories behind many works, whether technical or personal. In one set of snapshots, the human figure covered by crushed bits of Christmas ornaments turned out to be the former partner of Timo Kloeppel, the artist. Another series, by Catherine Yass, features “sandwiches” of a negative and positive of the same scene, a Jewish community centre in North London that was demolished. Ms Yass left the film attached to walls and demolition equipment as the work went on, then recovered it from the scene, the damage having become an intrinsic part of the work, as can be seen in “Decommissioned #12 (JCC)”, pictured.


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Leading by creativity




When you repress something, it can bloom back in full force. And we’ve noticed a bit of a “renaissance” in the creative fields happening in the city as of late. From designers to dancers, actors to architects, painters to poets and singers to start-up entrepreneurs, Bangkok’s bubbling away with an energy never before seen.

Creativity is living everywhere, from the way people are wearing their clothes to the way the food is being arranged on our plates. People are even incorporating beer drinking into their yoga routine. If that’s not creative, then we don’t know what is!

Tawn Chatchavalvong Fashion Designer
“As a designer, what do I do? I don’t just sit and draw everyday […]. How do I communicate my vision, my story, to my team and my customer? That is the key question. How my answer to that question is executed is where the real creativity happens.”

Pimdao Sukhahuta Founder and Creative Director of Fashion Brand, Sretsis “Creativity is about problem solving, but in an artistic way. So, I think it can be applied to many different aspects of how we do things at a personal or public level.”

Vitchukorn Chokedeetaweeanan Creative Director of Greyhound Original “Working in a team often brings new insights and ideas. You can get inspiration from anything and you don’t need to be a designer to see that.”

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Instagram encroaches on Snapchat's turf of social media influencers, winning their hearts, minds and




"We saw a decline in viewership on Snapchat and an increase on Instagram," Markowitz told CNBC recently.
The shift mirrors the relentless rise of the Facebook-owned Instagram Stories platform since its launch nearly one year ago, costing Snapchat its popularity with a medium it largely pioneered.

In a space built on an instantly recorded video where two giants are slugging it out for users, is there room for both?
Instagram Stories continues to launch new features, including live video and allowing users to offer external links to their fan base. The additional features are prompting creators like Alex Crockford, a U.K.-based fitness influencer, to move 90 percent of his attention toward Instagram Stories over Snapchat.

"Bit by bit, I have seen my peers and social groups give up Snapchat and go totally [Instagram] stories, even ones that say they never would."

He’s not deleting his Snapchat account anytime soon, though. "The positives of my Snapchat followers is that they seem extremely loyal," he said. "They seem a bit more like a big family group."


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