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Creative Links

The photography market isn’t just about names




The most expensive photograph ever sold was not by a photographer, nor was the photograph taken by the artist. “The New Jeff Koons (1980)” is a primary-school photograph of the artist sitting with a box of crayons, mounted as a black-and-white, 40-x-30-inch (102-x-76cm) transparency on a lightbox and sold in 2013 for $9.4m. This is atypical for photography, where prices are lower and volumes are higher than in other contemporary art. The average photograph sells for $10,000 at auction, against $60,000 for a painting.

“The New Jeff Koons” is a unique work. Most fine-art photographs, though, are printed in signed limited editions, normally of between eight and 15 photos. For works made from negatives, the photographers or their estates keep tight control to ensure that no new prints can be made, which would amount to defrauding the original buyers. As the edition begins to sell out, prices rise. With limited-edition prints from digital photography, photographers usually promise to destroy the files. Some collectors will not touch digital, but others are perfectly happy to collect it, and prices are not generally lower than recent work produced on film.

Gallerists at Photo London were keen to tell the stories behind many works, whether technical or personal. In one set of snapshots, the human figure covered by crushed bits of Christmas ornaments turned out to be the former partner of Timo Kloeppel, the artist. Another series, by Catherine Yass, features “sandwiches” of a negative and positive of the same scene, a Jewish community centre in North London that was demolished. Ms Yass left the film attached to walls and demolition equipment as the work went on, then recovered it from the scene, the damage having become an intrinsic part of the work, as can be seen in “Decommissioned #12 (JCC)”, pictured.


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Leading by creativity
For many of us, creativity was stifled during childhood and at school. This is a tremendous shame, as the power of creativity and the benefits it can have on society are endless. But there’s good news…

Instagram encroaches on Snapchat's turf of social media influencers, winning their hearts, minds and
In a recent study, social media marketing firm Mediakix looked at 12 top influencers who maintain a dual presence on Instagram and Snapchat. The firm found that over a 30-day period, those accounts overwhelmingly preferred Instagram Stories to Snapchat, posting 25 percent more on the former than the latter.

No, the Inflight Magazine isn't dead
Since they first started appearing in cabins 60 years ago, the inflight magazine has become an essential part of the flying experience for millions of passengers. But nowadays we have smartphones and Wi-Fi increasingly creeping onto planes. And with their emergence, many people are asking if the inflight magazine is going to disappear forever.

Why the advertising industry should cheer new rules on gender stereotypes
Britain’s advertising watchdog is introducing tough new standards, which could ban adverts which feature potentially harmful gender stereotypes. This could not have come at a better time for the industry. Companies have failed to see the evidence that’s been staring them in the face – and this ruling will push them down a path that should already be well worn.

Mind healing: Can you really boost your own creativity?
A recent study suggests a surprising way to boost your creative powers: use “switch-tasking”. Jackson Lu and colleagues at Columbia University asked participants to complete tasks involving convergent thinking (problem solving, Experiment 1) and divergent thinking (idea generating, Experiment 2).

Over 100 years later, photographer Alice Austen is finally being recognized as an LGBTQ icon
By all accounts, photographer Alice Austen was an extraordinary woman. Born into an affluent family on Staten Island in 1866, she challenged oppressive Victorian conventions by embracing individuality and independence.

Photographers and Photo Editors on the passion that drives their work
Why do they do it? Why do they wake up every morning ready to take photographs, to edit them, to publish them? Why is photography important to them and, by extension, to all of us?

Machine creativity beats some modern art
Creativity is one of the great challenges for machine intelligence. There is no shortage of evidence showing how machines can match and even outperform humans in vast areas of endeavor, such as face and object recognition, doodling, image synthesis, language translation, a vast variety of games such as chess... But when it comes to creativity, the machines lag well behind.

Hong Kong builds itself into a hub of creativity
Hong Kong has a reputation as a world-class center for finance, shipping and logistics. The metropolis is emerging as a capital of creativity and innovation.

The ethics of using AI in advertising
As an industry, advertising has long been obsessed with understanding human behaviour. The ability of artificial intelligence (AI) systems to transform vast amounts of complex, ambiguous information into insight is driving personal analysis into market behaviour.

Apple announces winners of the 10th iPhone Photography Awards
Apple has been marketing the iPhone as the ultimate camera smartphone since the first one rolled out. Last year’s iPhone 7 Plus introduced a dual camera sensor to the Apple flagship, initiating a wild trend of dual cameras on smartphones across all price ranges.

Photo-Sharing Phenom VSCO is teaching computers to interpret art like a human
Since launching in 2011, photo-sharing app VSCO has found a healthy niche among professional photographers and others looking to get feedback and improve their skills. On the surface, it offers an experience comparable to Instagram. But the idea is to share images as a way to connect with others and draw inspiration, not to increase your follower count or reach a certain number of likes, comments, or shares.

Guess who made computers the design tools they are today? Women
Virtually all design today involves a computer, but in the early age of digital design, most professionals perceived these new machines skeptically–they were devices meant for the military, not creatives. Today, that’s all changed due in large part to Susan Kare, Zuzana Licko, and April Greiman–three California designers who transformed the computer from an enigmatic machine into a powerful medium.

Branded content can't depend on creativity alone
More and more, marketers consider themselves brand storytellers. And at this point in the maturation of branded content, most of the energy seems to be focused on the creative—the sexy, award-winning side of the story. But can creativity alone move branded content into a full-grown piece of every marketer's channel strategy?

Customer Experience: all or nothing, Adobe's CEO tells Summit EMEA attendees
Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen opened the Adobe Summit EMEA show in London with a message that all businesses are now riding the experience wave. Customer experience is all or nothing, protecting the status quo is no longer an option.

Create your own energy
Imagine, innovate, inspire, express... just what is the elusive force that is creativity? Richard Buchanan, managing director and founder, The Clearing, on what creativity means to him.

Stronger privacy laws could save advertising from itself
Online advertising is terrible. Ads clutter your screen, slow down your computer, and drain your batteries. Publishers saddle pages with tracking technology that vacuums up your data so they can, ostensibly, serve you more relevant ads (though this practice really just leads to serious privacy concerns).

The Brexit challenges facing the creative industries
The Power of Creativity and Brexit paint a testing picture for the industry, with potentially huge impacts from changes to freedom of movement, loss of investment and funding and less access to markets after Brexit.

Book publishing in the digital age
In 2012, Thought Catalog Books was launched. There were two questions driving the identity of the book startup: In the age of algorithms and social media, can we create an enclave where creative and intellectual sophistication still matter? Can we build a publishing model where readers instead of advertisers are the main stakeholders?

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